As it Strikes Me

The greatness of Srimad Bhagavatam (Bhagavata Mahatmya) is beautifully outlined in six chapters of Padma Purana. In that, it has been said that Bhakti had its roots in the Dravida Desha and spread to other states. This was a representation of the fact that the first three Azhwars were the foremost of all the devotees. Only after them came the other Azhwars and devotees across the country.

Sri Sandeepani was the Guru of Lord Krishna. He was one who knew all the Vedas, the Six Agamas, and all the Shastras. It was his longtime desire and thirst to have a student who can learn all of it from him. However he did not find such a capable student as all of his students could acquire only a limited knowledge from him. It is only to fulfill his desire that Lord Krishna became his student.

When someone wishes for Jnana, they want it out of fear of the society, or the fear of the 'Samsara’ (the vicious cycle of births and deaths).
However, when we see the case of great 'bhaktas’ (devotees), they revel in the love for God and sing His praises, right from their childhood. This, they do out of unconditional love for God, and not driven by any fear or reason.

It seems a common trend to talk at length about always wishing well for fellow human beings. It is definitely a noble thought and needs to be executed, undoubtedly. But an unbiased introspection of the tendencies of most men leaves us baffled.

One cannot come into being in this world without a mother and a father. Parents even do a lot of menial service to the child like cleaning up when the child dirties itself. They also provide for the physical, emotional and intellectual growth of the child. This momentous work done by parents is soon forgotten…

Among the astikas (those who have faith in our scriptures) we find that some follow astrological planetary movements and its influence on their life very carefully. In fact they are very concerned about the influence of faraway planets like Saturn on their lives. If the influence is malignant, they would not hesitate to even perform prayaschittams (expiatory rites to alleviate its influence).

Generally, we are thankful to one who has done us a good turn. When we stand to gain due to another’s help either financially, materially or physically we feel grateful to him. We revere this person who has helped us. If the help was a timely one, we feel moved. But this alone cannot be a sign of our gratitude.

In spiritual life there are two things - being subject-conscious and being object-conscious. Thinking of Bhagavan is being 'subject-conscious'. Thinking of what the aspirant has achieved -- his progress, his spiritual experiences so far, etc. -- is being 'object-conscious'.